First hold peace within yourself, only then can you bring it to others.~Thomas a Kempis
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omaha yoga path | Mindfulness Retreat in the Tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh

Omaha Yoga Path Post

Mindfulness Retreat in the Tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh

Realizing the Path of Awareness:

 “A Return to the Fundamentals of Mindfulness, Understanding and Compassion”

The Honey Locust Sangha Spring Retreat

Thursday, April 25 – Sunday, April 28

Creighton University Retreat Center, Griswold, Iowa

With teachings and meditations on breathing, walking, deep listening and loving speech, we will practice together.  We will invite our ancestors, with both their suffering and their happiness, to join and support us, as we offer our awakening for the benefit of our families, our society and the Earth.

During this program we will focus on fundamental practices – skill building to solidify our experience of inner stability and freedom.  Guidance on conscious breathing and walking will be a base for deepening our communication and understanding within ourselves and with our loved ones. Sessions of guided deep looking will support us to reflect on the way we have been living our life, to understand what deep habits and fears have been driving us, and to find new understanding and compassion to realize transformation.

Dharma Teacher:
Michael Ciborski

Michael Ciborski is a Mindfulness Dharma teacher in the Buddhist tradition of Venerable Thich Nhat Hanh. He was ordained as a monk for seven years at the Plum Village Monastery, France. Michael practiced mindfulness meditation and joined the monastic community to organize mindfulness retreats to lay practitioners around the world. 

An eloquent musician, Michael also studied several European and Asian voice training and chanting traditions and served as an English language chant master in the monastery.

After leaving the monastery in 2003, Michael returned to the US and along with his wife Fern, has helped to establish spiritual community and mindfulness center in Southern New Hampshire known as MorningSun. He offers many workshops and retreats in mindfulness practice and meditation around the country. To listen to his Dharma talks, please visit (http://truemiddleway.org/dharma-talks/)

Held in the tranquil setting of the

Held in the tranquil setting of the
Creighton University Retreat Center

It is a quiet place in nature, near Griswold Iowa, about 45 minutes from Omaha. CURC is a full-service retreat center with excellent meeting/conference rooms, overnight facilities, dining hall, and chapel. 

The comfortable facilities and hospitable environment are set in 157 acres of wooded area, with ambling trails along a river teeming with wildlife, song birds, and a sublime night sky.

Retreat Format

This residential retreat is designed for both beginning and experienced practitioners. It will center on periods of sitting and walking meditation and Dharma talks by our teacher. There will be small-group Dharma discussions, meal meditations, and active, mindful work practice. Periods of silence will deepen and enrich the experience by allowing time for personal reflection.

Retreat Pricing

Thursday  Evening – Sunday

Double Occupancy: $310.00*  

Single Occupancy: $375.00

Friday – Sunday

Double Occupancy: $240.00* 

Single Occupancy: $305.00

Price includes meals, dana, room costs, and dharma hall fees

*Rooming with another person will allow us to increase the number of people who can attend the retreat, so if you are able to choose double occupancy, it would be appreciated.

Register by clicking this link: 

http://tinyurl.com/37fc5kba

or use the QR code below:

 
Email Image

The Honey Locust Sangha / Omaha Community of Mindful Living is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

Sound Healing Workshop

Sound Healing Workshop with Lifang Huang

Sound Healing allows one to go deeper into meditative states through subtle, yet complex harmonic frequencies. While listeners rest comfortably, the sound helps to soothe pain, reduce stress and anxiety, and opens the body to receptive healing. The music that emanates from the bowls helps balance the five elements.

At the Yoga Path

Saturday November 4, 1:00 – 3:00 pm.

Presented by Lifang Huang shamanic teacher and healer

Lifang Huang is shaman, healer, teacher blessed with a mystical understanding of healing sound vibrations. She has traveled extensively through Nepal, India, Southeast Asia, and now the United States sharing her gifts as a sound energy healer. 

Lifang Huang has a unique understanding of sound vibrations. Over the years she has created her own therapy styles combining various techniques she has learned during her many years of practice with Tibetan Sound Bowls along with other instruments to share this very therapeutic practice.

Save this date and time. Register early as space will be limited to preserve the intimacy of this workshop. 

Cost is $25.00

Register below

 

Save this date and time. Register early as space will be limited to preserve the intimacy of this workshop.
Price: $ 25.00

The Embodied Practice

The goal of this workshop is to craft a self-practice of yoga into your life. Whether you attend one or all of these workshops, participants will develop a deeper and broader understanding of what yoga is and how it can be cultivated into one’s life.

Series of 3 workshops over 3 months \ Saturday afternoon(s) 12:30 to 4:30

Workshops would include gentle and intense asana, pranayama (breath work), meditation, along with various group exercises and dharma discussions about aspects of yoga practice.
We encourage students to attend all three of the workshops to gain the greatest benefits, but you can all register for individual workshops. t

Teachers

All workshops will be taught by Yoga Path teachers Kim Schwab and Mark Watson.

Who should attend?

Aspiring students  who are seeking to enhance or jump-start their practice of yoga.  A mindful-based practice that can be embodied into the corners of our everyday life.
 All classes will be taught at the Yoga Path.

Cost is $100/workshop or $240 for all three.
Space is limited, so register early!

Workshop 1 – Sitting with Your Practice (February 18)

  • Introductions
  • Satya instruction
  • Asana practice
  • Meditation
  • Tea & dharma talk & discussion

Workshop 2 – Standing with Your Practice (March 18)

  • Opening Meditation Sit
  • Satya instruction
  • Asana practice
  • Sculpting exercise
  • Tea & dharma talk & discussion

Workshop 3 – Walking with Your Practice (April 15)

  • Short Meditation
  • Satya instruction
  • Asana practice
  • Meditation/Deep Relaxation
  • Tea & dharma talk & discussion

Readings from the 2019 Winter Immersion

Awakened Mind, Quiet Life

Meditating Zombie

Sometimes we travel through our day on a kind of auto-pilot. Gliding to where we’re going, at times, forgetting what we are doing. Meanwhile our mind is  in a cloud of ruminations about past regrets or future worries. Yet these states of mind are tumultuous, scattered, and dispersed. There is no quiet stability for us to listen.

This year for the Year-end immersion workshop, we will explore ways  to practice Awakening the Mind with Mindful Yoga. And learn ways to offer ourselves the gift of a Quiet Life in midst of a noisy world. In doing so we will touch the wondrous, refreshing, and healing elements that are in us and around us in every situation

“Then the soul is a lamp whose light is steady, for it burns in a shelter where no winds come.” 
Bhagavad Gita Ch.VI.v.19

The Essence of Stillness

When we release our ideas, thoughts, and concepts, we
make space for our true mind. Our true mind is silent of all
words and all notions, and is so much vaster than limited
mental constructs. Only when the ocean is calm and quiet
can we see the moon reflected in it.
Silence is ultimately something that comes from the heart,
not from any set of conditions outside us. Living from a
place of silence doesn’t mean never talking, never
engaging or doing things; it simply means that we are not
disturbed inside; there isn’t constant internal chatter. If
we’re truly silent, then no matter what situation we find
ourselves in, we can enjoy the sweet spaciousness of
silence.
There are moments when we think we’re being silent
because all around us there’s no sound, but unless we
calm our mind, talking is still going on all the time inside
our head. That’s not true silence. The practice is learning
how to find silence in the midst of all the activities we do.

Try to change your way of thinking and your way of
looking. Sitting down to eat your lunch may be an
opportune time for you to offer yourself the sweetness of
silence. Even though others may be speaking, you have
the ability to disengage from habitual thinking and be very
silent inside. You can be in a crowded space, yet still enjoy
silence and even solitude.
from the book Silence, Thich Nhat Hanh  p. 76 

White-Eyes
Mary Oliver
 
In winter 
    all the singing is in 
         the tops of the trees 
             where the wind-bird 
 
with its white eyes 
    shoves and pushes 
         among the branches. 
             Like any of us 
 
he wants to go to sleep, 
    but he’s restless— 
         he has an idea, 
             and slowly it unfolds 
 
from under his beating wings 
    as long as he stays awake. 
         But his big, round music, after all, 
             is too breathy to last. 
 
So, it’s over. 
    In the pine-crown 
         he makes his nest, 
             he’s done all he can. 
 
I don’t know the name of this bird, 
    I only imagine his glittering beak 
         tucked in a white wing 
             while the clouds— 
 
which he has summoned 
    from the north— 
         which he has taught 
             to be mild, and silent— 
 
thicken, and begin to fall 
    into the world below 
         like stars, or the feathers 
               of some unimaginable bird 
 
that loves us, 
    that is asleep now, and silent— 
         that has turned itself 
             into snow.

Theresa de Avila

“Today may there be peace within. May you trust that you are exactly where you are meant to be. 
May you not forget the infinite possibilities that are born of faith in yourself and others. 
May you use the gifts that you have received and pass on the love that has been given to you. 
May you be content with yourself just the way you are. Let this knowledge settle into your bones, and allow your soul the freedom to sing, dance, praise and love. It is there for each and every one of us.”
BREATH  
Kabir 
 
Are you looking for me? I am in the next seat.
My shoulder is against yours.
You will not find me in stupas, not in Indian shrine rooms, nor in synagogues, nor in cathedrals;
Not in masses, nor kirtans, not in legs winding around your own neck, nor in eating nothing but vegetables.
When you really look for me you will see me instantly – you will find me in the tiniest house of time.
Kabir says: Student, tell me, What is God?
He is the breath inside the breath.

Winter Is the Best Time
David Budbill

Winter is the best time
to find out who you are.
 
Quiet, contemplation time,
away from the rushing world,
 
cold time, dark time, holed-up
pulled-in time and space
 
to see that inner landscape,
that place hidden and within
“Real solitude comes from a stable heart that does not get carried away by the pull of the crowd, nor by sorrows of the past, worries about the future, or excitement or stress about the present.”
Thich Nhat Hanh

Thinking Less

While we practice conscious breathing, our thinking will slow down, and we can give ourselves a real rest. Most of the time, we think too much, and mindful breathing helps us to be calm, relaxed, and peaceful. It helps us stop thinking so much and stop being possessed by sorrows of the past and worries about the future. It enables us to be in touch with life, which is wonderful in the present moment.

 Of course, thinking is important, but quite a lot of our thinking is useless. It is as if, in our head, each of us has a cassette tape that is always running, day and night. We think of this and we think of that, and it is difficult to stop. With a cassette, we can just press the stop button. But with our thinking, we do not have any button. We may think and worry so much that we cannot sleep. If we go to the doctor for some sleeping pills or tranquilizers, these may make the situation worse, because we do not really rest during that kind of sleep, and if we continue using these drugs, we may become addicted. We continue to live tensely, and we may have nightmares.

 According to the method of conscious breathing, when we breathe in and out, we stop thinking, because saying “In” and “Out” is not thinking—

“In” and “Out” are only words to help us concentrate on our breathing. If we keep breathing in and out this way for a few minutes, we become quite refreshed. We recover ourselves, and we can encounter the beautiful things around us in the present moment. The past is gone, the future is not yet here. If we do not go back to ourselves in the present moment, we cannot be in touch with life.

 When we are in touch with the refreshing, peaceful, and healing elements within ourselves and around us, we learn how to cherish and protect these things and make them grow. These elements of peace are available to us anytime.

Peace Is Every Step by Thich Nhat Hanh

“The mind is restless, impetuous, self-willed, hard to train: to master the mind seems as difficult as to master the mighty winds.”
Bhagavad Gita Ch.VI.v34

Six Mantras

The Six Mantras

June 16, 2012. 99-minute dharma talk by Thich Nhat Hanh from Upper Hamlet in Plum Village during the 21-Day Retreat with the theme The Science of the Buddha. The talk is given in English and this is the eleventh dharma talk (of 15). The podcast is available at this link.

1.teaPK Darling, I am here for you.
2.
Darling, I know you are there and it makes me happy.
3.
Darling, I know you suffer.
4.
Darling, I suffer, please help.
5.
This is a Happy Moment.
6.
Darling, you are partly right.

The last one is new and for when someone congratulates or criticizes you.

Tea on the Brain

Been a long time since making an entry in this category — tea, but I always marvel at the relationship of tea in Buddhism, Yoga, and meditation. Now here is a neurological explain for human predilection for Camellia sinensis.

[vimeo 114499613 w=500 h=375]

  • January 6th, 2015
  • Posted in Tea
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Mindfulness Resources

The Miracle of Mindfulness: An Introduction to the Practice of Meditation by Thich Nhat Hanh

When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times by Pema Chodron

Wherever You Go, There You Are by Jon Kabat-Zinn

The Wise Heart: A Guide to the Universal Teachings of Buddhist Psychology by Jack Kornfield

The Science of Enlightenment by Shinzen Young

Breakfast with Buddha by Roland Merullo

Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life by Richard Rohr

Be Free Where You Are by Thich Nhat Hanh and Sister Chan Khong

Making Space: Creating a Home Meditation Practice by Thich Nhat Hanh

 No Time to Lose: A Timely Guide to the Way of the Bodhisattva by Pema Chodron

Bringing Yoga to Life: The Everyday Practice of Enlightened Living by Donna Farhi

 

Spring Mindfulness Retreat

Here is the announcement about Spring Mindfulness Retreat 2014 sponsored by the Honey Locust Sangha / Omaha Community of Mindful Living.

  • February 24th, 2014
  • Posted in Education
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It’s time to wake up

Ever since November retreat where I met Mary Pipher and read her most recent book, The Green Boat, my life has taken a change. I’m one of those thousands of people who have largely stuck my head in the sand about Climate Change. In spite of all the evidence surrounding this topic, in spite of someone who purports to believe in science and enjoys many of the luxuries it provides, I somehow wanted to believe that scientist had gotten this wrong and that we’d be OK. But thanks to Pipher and all her supporting research, I’ve come to what environmentalist call “the oh shit” moment. And with it all crippling despair that comes with it.

I wonder if a collection of astronomer came together and all agreed that the earth was definitely going to be hit with a planet-destroying meteor in fifty years, there would be other astronomer to refute it. Then if the meteor-believers came back and said we could, as a world community come up with the means to divert this meteor, but our chances would be better, if we did something about sooner than later, what do you think the world community would do? It certainly would be more convenient to believe the meteor-refuters; make you feel better too. However, if you did really believe the meteor is coming, everything else pales in the shadow of that meteor. War, terrorism, balanced budgets, the EU, Wall Street, or A Rod’s one year suspension, all become that many more deck chairs on the Titanic to re-arranged.

Well the meteor is coming in the form of climate change! I know this because of the shadow it casts. That shadow was revealed to by the website: What Is Missing, designed by Maya Lin. This was the artist who designed the Vietnam War memorial. This site shows us species, habitats, and environments that use to exist, but have been lost because of human interaction. This is the shadow that lomes over any debate about global warming. Looking at the past, seeing clearly the present, there can be little debate about the trajectory of our future, if we don’t change.

Yet ,like Mary Pipher’s The Green Boat, Maya Lin’s site offers solutions and hope, if one spends time with either. When I encountered my “oh shit” angst, I wanted to run out into the streets and yellto  the world we need to drop everything and reduce our carbon footprint. But what good is a yogi in straight jacket and padded cell. So I said nothing. Now I realize it needs to be addressed; it needs to be talked about, it needs to be recognized. That’s the starting point.  I encourage you to read The Green Boat and if that’s too much, take 30 minutes and watch the video on this blog’s prior entry, Reconnecting to the Web of Life. Mary Pipher does a wonderful job of summarizing her book. Then go the What Is Missing site. Give yourself another 30 minutes on it. Without any judgements, see what it has to offer, by one of the world’s most renown living artists. It’s a place to start to wake up.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/0cFbLBQ9J-A]

Interbeing at a Retreat

This weekend I attended a Mindfulness Retreat in the Tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh.  It was put on by the Heartland Community of Mindful Living lead by the dharma teacher Joanne Friday.  It was a transformative and refreshing experience, but that is not what I want to talk about right now. What I want to talk about it this women I met there. Perhaps some of you have heard of Dr. Mary Pipher.  When I was talking to her I didn’t know who I was talking to.  Now I know.  Author of Reviving Ophelia and her most recent book The Green Boat: Reviving Ourselves in Our Capsized Culture.  Here is a talk she gave recently about her newest book.  I believe there is significance in that I would me this women in context of this Buddhist retreat.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViiKaiXlZJU

  • November 4th, 2013
  • Posted in Stories
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